Where is the Green Sheep?

4 reasons you should add Where is the Green Sheep to your bookshelf.

(If you haven’t already!)

1. It’s just plain fun to read.

The sing song repetition of the story is delightful to little ears. It gives language a musical quality and the pattern of the sentences makes it easy for tiny kiddos to predict the language and remember what happens next. This sort of predicting and repetitive language is how your little love will learn sentence structure. A child’s receptive language is much stronger than their expressive language, that is they are able to receive the information they are hearing much earlier than they are able to use that language themselves. The more often you expose them to sentence structures and phrases, the sooner they learn to use them. (This is why it’s totally ok to read the same book over and over again!)

2. Simplicity

Where is the Green Sheep uses simple, toddler friendly language. It is vocal they are familiar with and a sentence structure you can help them practice in their every day life.

“Where is the blue block?”

“Here is the blue block!”

“Where is your drink bottle?”

“Here is your drink bottle!”

model language

3. Colour

We meet the red sheep and the blue sheep straight away, and can see the purple and yellow sheep joining the red sheep for birthday cake at the end of the story. The illustrations use bold colours that make it easy for little people to identify. Can you see the red train? The yellow car? What colour is her surfboard? What colour is the star. Questions like these are a great way of letting your little person practice their talking and sentence structures. For the tiniest babes, you asking and answering the question is a wonderful way to model language for your child. (Honestly – no matter how teeny tiny they are!)

helps reinforce colour

4. Opposites

For tiny kiddos, you can explicitly tell them, “Up and down are opposites”. For older kiddos you can ask them questions like “What is the opposite of up?”, or, “Can you think of an opposite for thin?”. Broaden this conversation into opposites that aren’t in the book, too. What is the opposite of big, tall, etc.

reinforces opposites

You can find more books to add to your bookshelf and activities for kiddos HERE.

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